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with. the presiding officer: without objection. the senator from california. mrs. boxer: mr. president, i have listened to the senator from ohio, and i really want to be heard because he's talking about the fiscal cliff and how upset he is at the thought that the wealthiest people in america might go back to the tack rates we had under bill clinton when we had the greatest prosperity, we had 23 million new jobs, and we balanced the budget to the point where we even had a surplus. and my friend comes down here and he's complaining that the proposal on the table would give 98% of the people a tax cut, and he's upset that 2% of the people might have to go back to the rates under bill clinton. well, i just want to say something. we just had an election. we had a big election. we had a tough election. we had an expensive election. and one of the major parts of that election revolved around what do we do about the deficits, what do we do about economic growth, what do we do about spending, and we discussed it in the senate races, we discussed it in the house races, and of course president ob
election on either side. >> i will turner to the audience starting with dan glickman but california we have had a big shake up there in a new redistricting -- what are you watching in california? >> air seats that are in levels of contention. summer non-republican and democrat on democrat spending huge sums of money. as republican campaign chairman, california is always the toughest state force in a presidential race and eyes in eyes has been going into the presidency year, the turnout could hurt us. once you get and lend inland a little bit, california a little bit different at this point but that is something. it comes late and we want to make sure in we don't get her clock cleaned. i always get nervous about california. >> i advise pointed out to my friends at my home state of texas does not believe in referendum, recall or that good government stuff and i think we don't have term limits. i think that the fact that we have this crazy long california which was the result of the referendum i think is unfortunate and not good for the political process. >> the primary or the redistricting co
.c. for a while, moved to california. i was married for a while in california and then i moved to washington and i wasn't married again, and now i'm about to get married again. [laughter] so, thank you. hopefully it's the same guy. don't forget that. [laughter] >> you don't get gifts every time he there. that's problem. so i did have this very, i certainly had a personal stake in that so i was very pleasantly surprised him outside and i do think also, i want to look at this deeper but it feels to me like this time the disconnect between the power of voting and the actual voting wasn't as big as it was in the past which just the extent that people were saying different things, if that ever was true, it feels like in this race are polling suggested that was kind of the margin and we won by the margins that were fairly close to the polling and i think if that's true that's very good news for us as we go forward with this kind of thinking. i think there was a tendency to feel that we had to really get very high numbers and so that was good news. >> that was let -- i was less confident about the racin
wasn't married, i lived in live in washington dc, i moved to california. i was married for a wild in california. then i moved to washington and i wasn't married again. now, i am about to be married again. [laughter] thank you. >> hopefully this same guy? [laughter] >> yes, we can't forget that. >> yes, you don't get gifts every time either. that's a problem. [laughter] so i did have this very -- i certainly had a personal stake in that. so i was very proud and 10 pleasantly surprised on that front. i also want to look at this deeper. but it feels to me like this time the disconnect between the voting was not as big as it had been in the past. suggesting that people were saying different things. it feels like in this race, the polling suggested that that was kind of the margin and we won by a margin and we were fairly close to the polling. i think if that is true, it's very good news for us as we go forward with this kind of thing. i think there was a tendency for us to feel that we really had to get very high numbers. so that was good news in my world. >> the staff said one thing,
aren't we getting together? >> that is a great idea. >> if you change california i could tell you sacramento is broke and. please but against every single tax. [applause] >> this crowd does not need to be reminded. >> the ballot is very long. vote against every single one. it's like giving her a went to a junkie. >> herald-tribune is for sale. how do we by media? >> bella also like to comment on the public-school said. liberals don't favor that but they send their kids to the white private school it does not matter to them but who is by teeing the vouchers to the and mail and al gore was asked in the debate in harlem and he was running for president as he was beholden to the teachers' unions a black reporter said if you are so big on the public schools then why do your kids go to private schools? he got angry and said don't bring my children and to this. way to. [laughter] hold on. not so fast. is great to start another fox news but why is that the only game in town? they have 10 times the ratings of cnn but it has not occurred two msnbc they are getting higher ratings of wonder i
cummings for bringing this issue along with you. amtrak is extremely important to california. we have three of the top five busiest corridors in our california area. two of them are supported totally by the state. i see that there are some cuts coming through and i'm going to be looking at that very closely because it has a 2.8 million ridership. our state support services program as has been stated, vitality must be supported for the state-supported services program. incentivizing the states to work with passenger rail service to complement the national network. is important to all states, especially california, we are a donor states because gives more options to commuters and many intercity travelers while reducing pollution. california's been at the forefront of reduction of pollution and cars and several other areas and we continue to look for ways to be able to get people out of cars and into public transportation. the transportation commission are voicing their opinions -- talk to the transportation secretary brian kelly and rail to finish billbrad beyond keon how they view amtrak's w
their campuses safer. states from california to florida have introduced legislation to make it clear that child abuse reporting is not only a moral duty, but it's the law. this is tremendous progress. laws strengthens, policies tightened, governance revisited, and institutions made safer, and our work continues. that brings us to today, on the brink of the one year anniversary, civil lawsuits, perjury trials, and we can expect more fallout to come. over the last year, we have learned much about ourselves, our many cultures, our values, and our vision. we're still working through some difficult issues, but the question remains where do we go from here? the answer can be found by returning to penn state's core mission -- teaching, research, and service. our bottom line is delivering an outstanding education to students. our students are our top priority. i repeat, our students are our top priority, and they are doing great things. for example, this year, our journalism students captured the national championship in the william randolff hurst journalism award. engineering students took top honors
and buy the media? if you change california, blue, broken, broken, sacramento is broken. vote against every single tax, every single one. [applause] please vote against measures. >> i don't think the crowd needs to be reminded of that. [laughter] ann, the ballot is long. >> right. >> there's ten taxes there. vote against every single one. >> right. >> the last thing sacramento needs it more money. it's like giving heroin to a junky. >> i think you may need to go bankrupt. >> how do you buy media, but -- >> i'd also like to comment on your taking over the public schools and actually producing useful ones. liberals don't favor that, but liberals move heaven and earth to send their kids to private schools. that doesn't matter to them what happens in the public schools, and who is it fighting the vouchers tooth and nail. al gore was asked in a debate in harlem when he was running for president because he had been, you know, of course, the democrats that are beholding to the teachers' unions, and so a black gal reporter got up and said, now, you know, if you're big on the public schools, s
won this election by a 50-48% margin. that may go up to around off 51-48 when california comes in california's last time to wipe weeks to count its votes. account with five cars in brazil but i'm not sure what california is so much less technologically advanced. but there we are. for all these figures are necessarily a little incomplete as they apply to the nation. there's some other states with votes still out, too. it appears that obama will get a huge electoral vote advantage out of this relatively narrow popular vote margin. assuming he carries florida what he is in current counts ahead in the miami-dade county, people are this year counting votes without the assistance of many republican and democratic lawyers. with florida commit electoral vote, 332-206. bush was a 51-40 margin in 2004 only got 286 votes. obama was slightly less it appeared, gets 332. i think there's a certain structural demographic advantage for democrats in the electoral college in this era. democratic voters tend to be clustered in something large metropolitan areas, and in particular neighborhoods, an
generations. as governor he compete with other states for jobs and subsidies are relatively easy. california -- [laughter] anybody from california? california, illinois, connecticut, thank you. but those states are doing is raising taxes, raising regulations and so that's, you know, we are competing. but we do every day is to try and find companies out there that can't compete. i think about simply if you're a business come to think of yourself as a consumer. as a consumer, name the time did the research yourself, i think i'll pay more for the project because i know that company is headquartered in a high tax state. or gosh, i know they have more regulations saw pay more for the product because i know cost the company more for more regulations or takes longer to get a permit. you don't do it. so if we make sure that florida businesses have lower taxes, less regulation and faster permitting time, a pro-business attitude to our businesses will outcompete everybody and will get more jobs and that's what we're doing every day. in contrast, my biggest competitor is texas. texas has been doing the
. i live in mississippi but i'm retired federal firefighter from california. and disasters, whether it's hurricanes, tornadoes, earthquakes, wildfires, whatever, most jurisdictions find that they're overwhelmed by the time it happens because disasters overwhelm every jurisdiction. so whether you're in new york or down in the coast of mississippi, the jurisdictions that are in charge of trying to mitigate these problems are so overwhelmed, and most are victims themselves. we need a national -- we need a national fire disaster program that exists within the federal government. the resources are there without going to a lot of expense. all disasters is similar to what would happen in a motel. a hotel, if everybody goes into a hotel, they see on the door what to do when a fire starts, how to get out, the hallways are designed to carry the capacity of the people, and so forth. and then once they're out they need to be accounted for. and he'd have an emergency service that can come in and mitigate the problem. most jurisdictions do not have the resources to do this. when it comes to police a
won this election by a 50-48% margin. debts may go up to around it 50-48 when the folks in california command and last time it took five weeks to count their votes. they count them in five hours in brazil so i'm not sure why california's less technologically advanced but there we are. all these figures are incomplete as they replied -- it appears obama will get a huge electoral vote advantage and out of this relatively narrow popular vote margin. assuming that he carries florida where he is the current ahead in the miami-dade county. people are are this year counting votes without the assistance of many republican and democratic lawyers. with florida his electoral vote victory is 332-206. bush was 51-48 margin in 2004 india 286 votes and obama was slightly less it appears against 332. i think there is a certain structure of demographic advantage for democrats in the electoral college in this era. democratic voters tend to be clustered into large metropolitan areas and in particular neighborhoods and they give them a craft an initial advantage in the electoral college. president obama
business quarters in our california area. two of them are supported totally by the state. pacific shoreline, 2.8 million. i will be looking at that very closely. it has a 2.8 million ridership. all three are state service programs. the vitality must be supported california has been at the forefront of reduction of pollution than cars and several other areas. we look at how giving people time to get out of cars and public transportation works. voicing the opinion on transportation secretary brian kelly, amtrak has worked with california and caltrans. it is very critical because they are the ones, who in the end, will work with the local communities to ensure that we get more people to utilize it. we must have a senior-level position with amtrak to work with them on their programs, and this is especially important. section 209, it negatively impacts the state of california. i also want to -- i want to add my 2 cents to the ranking member, elijah cummings, his statement on amtrak. they have done a beautiful job. i hope we will continue and we will continue to ensure that not only do they provi
experiment." he said, "i'm going to call you." and he was on his way to california. so he said, "i'm going to call you from california at your home, and i'm going to tell you that i'm going to come out endorsing ross perot for the presidency." c-span: and he thought that the bush administration was afraid of this? >> guest: yes. yes. actually, both sides might think, "well, what was going on with richard nixon if he's endorsing ross perot?" so he said, "i'm going to tell you that i'm endorsing ross perot. i want you to keep a straight face and a straight voice. don't let on to anything." and he said, "we're going to set this person up if, in fact, there are wiretaps on my phone." so he flew to california, he called me, we went through this little episode, and then nothing ever came of it. so either his phones weren't tapped or nobody thought enough of it to leak it. but it was just one of his little experiments. c-span: hugh sidey came to visit on day, the former time magazine journalist. i -- maybe he's still -- i think he might still write for them sometimes. he had a column on the presi
and kirkpatrick democratic candidate and jonathan hunton, a republican event in california 26th district also the democratic when julie of the tony strickland, the republican, and then also michigan first dan, the republican in a four way race is the victor in michigan first district. those are some of the races that have been called. there are a few other out standing once. go to our website come c-span.org, and then also as i told you yesterday in the presidential race, in florida has yet to be called here is the absentee ballot voting delay to push right on the floor of the election. we don't know where the 29 electoral votes will go but have made every outcome of the presidential election. back to the topic here. what was your message to washington? a lot of newspaper articles this morning about the fiscal the cliff and that is what faces -- >> we will leave this portion of this morning's washington journal now to go live to the american enterprise institute for panel discussions on the election with fox news channel commentator michael barone, inside out columnist norman borkenstein and
, a little california adventure, to mar run county, california, after being in manhattan or brooklyn for 21, 22 years. >> host: why'd you move out there? >> guest: we wanted to try something different. our kids were at a nice age where they were out of diapers, but today didn't yet have girlfriends -- [laughter] and we have three boys. and we have this nice thing where we can kind of live anywhere because we have a lot of flexibility. i don't have to go into a office, my wife -- who used to work at mtv -- isn't working there now. and so -- >> host: may we ask who your wife is? >> guest: my wife is alexa robinson, she was a producer at mtv. she wasn't a vijay. >> host: okay. >> guest: and she -- and so we wanted to try and go on some kind of adventure with the kids to take advantage of the fact that we can live anywhere. and i've always loved northern california, and i have a lot of friends out there. because of all the technology projects that i've been involved with and things that i've written about, you know, it was helpful professionally to be out there for a while. so we've been off on
. on marriage they were decisive to pass proposition 8 in california, 50% voted for proposition 8 in california. we are extremely conservative and we also have to understand that there's a big difference between the old latino community of some 20 or 30 years ago what i call the cesar chavez latino community, the puerto ricans in new york and chicago and those in the southwest since the u.s. basically took half of mexico and the new population which is 40% foreign-born and the rest of the children of immigrants come a very conservative i know when asked about government they may give answers that are not extraordinary that we get caught up in the polls we've seen it in this election cycle and besides pulling them with specific issues if we had a better understanding of what they are coming from you would get an understanding of why they are answering the question, but i believe with the latino community we lost the vote because of immigration. if we would have had a better position on immigration from the get go come from the primary government romney would have been competitive in those battle
to guess? [laughter] california. who would have thought? >> i would have thought new york. >> yeah, exactly. >> because of you. >> no. [laughter] of course, because of subways, but this is nontransportation. why? california's per capita -- 40% of our energy consumption is heating and cooling buildings where they be residential, commercial or factory. 35% is transportation. and california in 1978 passed building standards under then-governor brown who was known partially for this in the doons bury as governor moon beam. but he got it passed, so every new building in california had to meet energy efficiency standards. it's made california very efficient. these are the kinds of things, and as i said, portman and shaheen have been working on a compromise on this. these are the kinds of things we can do to make ourselves energy independent. my view, look, katrina -- sorry, sandy gave some impetus to dealing with climate change. and i said in new york we're going to pay for climate change one way or the ore. we can pay for it after each natural disaster. we in new york have had 50 -- sorry, we ha
south and west as california. those screws that can get in relatively fast have driven in. we still have equipment in teams on the west coast that the concern was still three to five days transit time to get them to the east coast. there's also concern that if they couldn't get back to their fire season when think it's going they would send the resources. so the president directed that we bring to bear dat resources aircraft. so there are teams and equipment that will be airlifted from california, west coast teams to support this response, but also understand that teams for our do nothing well before sandi hit. additional teams called from the midwest and the south, where it makes sense they can drive and faster. whether it makes sense to fly teams in come of the crew starts flying this afternoon. >> thank you, mr. chairman. >> next question from an adrenaline. >> hi, i'm wondering how the contracting process is going. i know some contracts are rhodium placed. this request for proposals for other types of aid. and also, this fema have enough money with a 3.6 billion, especially when the
they do once they're here because i didn't know. my first choice was the vietnamese in california who are there in huge numbers. they've now migrated from los angeles up towards san francisco, just like in miami in a way, there's -- the san jose mercury, a famous old newspaper is, there is now a viet-mercury. unfortunately, i couldn't speak vietnamese, and i couldn't read the paper either. i mean, just not even close. to ours. and then i heard about the following fact about miami: miami seems to be the only city in the whole world in which people from another country with another language and a very different culture took over at the voting machine a big, metropolitan area in just over i would say, slightly over one generation. i'm talking about the cubans. we have a havana-born gentleman here to my right, and so i said i've just got to go, i've got to go see what this is all about. i knew so little -- i still thought that the great industry was tourism in miami. and then i found out that for some time it's been shipping, including shipping that made the miami federal reserve bank hav
to life. on marriage, latinos were decisive to pass proposition eight in california, 53% of latinos voted for proposition eight in california. we are extremely conservative. i think, and we also have to understand there's some difference between the old latino community of say 20, 30 years ago what i call the cesar chavez a team community, and, the new york, the puerto ricans in new york and chicago, and those in the southwest, been in the u.s. since the was basically took half of mexico. and the new latino population which is foreign-born, 40% foreign-born, and the rest of the children of immigrants. very conservative. i know when asked about government they may give answers that are not extraordinary, but sometimes we get tangled, caught up with polls. resort have seen in this election cycle. and i think with latinos we cite polling with specific issues but is that a better understanding of where they're coming from you will get an understanding of why they're answering the questions that way. but i believe with the latino community, we lost the latino vote because of immigration. if we
university of california san diego, certificate in music and political philosophy from the university and soviet armenia, and his doctorate in international relations from oxford university what he was a marshall scholar. to my any of his richard solomon who is the assistant of state for for east asia and pacific affairs in 1989-1982 for president george h. w. bush. he served as president of united states institute of peace since 1993 during which time he oversaw its growth into a center of international conflict management analysis in applied programs. during his service in government doctor solomon negotiate the cambodia peace treaty, the first united nations permanent peacemaking agreement, a leading role in a dialogue commission issues between the united states and the koreans. helped establish aipac, the asia-pacific economic cooperation initiative ambiguous negotiations, japan, mongolia and vietnam on important bilateral issues. in 1992-93, doctor solomon shoulda susan glasser to the philippines recorded the closure of the u.s. naval bases and the new framework bilateral and reg
of this nation. and it holds true to all americans. from the migrant worker in california to the students here in this room and executives in new york city, we all cherish liberty. and i can't help but to feel we are among the greatest generation. [inaudible] we hold the world at our fingertips and we can change the world at the blink of an eye. to the innovation of social media we have brought the world closer together, and we've brought stories shared among all individuals. i have come to realize after having my article published in an online magazine, that to me proves to me that we do have a future. we must take full of vantage of our time in history. this is why i'm so honored to host the debate tonight with three speakers of three different perspectives and political ideology. i truly believe the discussions among these different perspectives and opinions can pay for which he american dream. all of our paths here for many years. today, we will write of our own future, our own destiny. i can't think of any better person to lead a debate more eloquently, efficiently, equally, and as an ind
of town meetings and they work incredibly well here. and california is other traditions people can build on. but if they can look inside in order to be a valuable process chemists and he needs to be inclusive, deliberative and needs to be empowered. that provides enough of a firmer are people too sad, you know, here's how we can do it in our area. but enough to to have town meetings and apples. we cannot larges and some other process in california piece of people can take the installation and use it wherever they are to the democratic possibility that rises up locally and hopefully in some ways that can have an impact on the national conversation. >> here we go. i am a librarian for the vermont historical society. we are in the fault of vermont history center. we have a photo album created by a vermonter who went down to view and take pictures of vermont troops during the civil war. he presented the supplements u.s. in 1863 after he had returned from his third trip to virginia, taking pictures mostly of vermonters in camp, but also some other scenes that he saw. one of the scenes that of
bookstores in america like cody's bookstore in berkeley, california, was firebombed. at a bookstore in london that was firebombed toys. bookstores all over the world that were attacked, not just burn but actually people going into bookstores and threatening people working there. and in publishing companies and then, well, the great tragedy was the books, the japanese translator, was murdered at his university in japan. and there was intent to murder and norwegian publisher and the italian translator of the book, for both fortunately survived. but this was a shooting war. and the point is that in all these cases, the evidence that emerged showed that these were professional hits. >> this was not spontaneous. >> no, no. these were professional hits. and so basically the danger was very high. until this moment in around the turn-of-the-century, when we finally managed to get the iranians to back down. and at the point at which we are convinced certain that the action had stood down these gangs of killers, really most of the danger went away. >> dr. hatchett and to this next question. what is the
to regulate the means of production of our agriculture products. a state like california might be fine that has defined a is coming to california shall be raised by hansen student cage size. start out being free range. nancy pelosi impose free range hens from exum re- -- in the captors in the building is remember. that california agenda violates the commerce clause of the constitution that where interstate commerce is regulate exclusively by congress, not the state. and our founding fathers understood but it needs to be stuck. i did put an amendment on the farm bill called the pike and mimic to protect interstate commerce an amendment which prohibits the states from regulating the means of production of our act product but there's a list that exists in the code. so that takes the states like california and arizona and florida out of the business of telling us, and iowa, how we're going to raise hands and produce eggs and how we're going to raise cattle and raise hogs. that's an important piece that as many fight in this campaign to go to have a lot of play in the press but that somethi
contact the jewish -- in oakland, california, perhaps their program could be a catalyst for peaceful future to is real and palestine. >> well, i'll have a look at the. if he gives me the details, he's looking rather mischievous about this. probably not what it entails but i will as always give due care and attention to his ideas. >> what particular discussions has the foreign secretary held with secretary clinton over egypt's role in brokering a comprehensive cease-fire agreement with the situation? mighty deal with issues such as border crossings and entries between gaza and egypt which would help reduce gaza's economic dependence upon israel? >> yes, we are in close hopes with unisys, having very regular discussion with secretary clinton and will be having another one very shortly. the wider solution for gaza, not just an immediate
to a country like indonesia, you know, this is a country that you put on a map, it goes from california to bermuda. it is huge. enormous population. and to reduce indonesia only to a bit player and be a role issue on the global war on terrorism department sit too well in indonesia. so i think part of the challenge was to really work with these countries in of themselves and not just as instrument of something that was going on in another part of the world. i came to the job by being ambassador in korea, and i walked in to a meeting that i thought was going to be with steve hadly and condoleezza rise joined the meeting. both steve and condoleezza said to me our country has been going through two wars and we need diplomats. they made it clear we need to start tamping down some issues in the world. we can't have everything kind of belowing up in the our faces. and one of the issues that i was very aware of coming from seoul was that if you did opinion survey in the fall of 2004, some 40% of south korea begans were blaming the united states for the north korea nuclear crisis, if you could i
transportation. we're in a global market place. i was in california last week, and we have to compete across the country. that involves technology, investment in technology, and i believe it starts to grade k-12. to talk about jobs for people in their 20s and 30s, that's important, but we don't focus on being more competitive and more advance the, we will not be competitive in the global marketplace, and that's core to the issue. >> moderator: mr. dalton, go ahead. dalton: briefly, middle class here facing camming thing middle class is across the country. it's due to the fact our government does not work together like everyone's said because they are controlled by special interests and major lobby groups that are to the putting in place specific things like comprehensive tax reform that makes sense, that's officially our accumulates revenue, and it's equitably distributed. what we need to do is make sure we have comprehensive tax reform that makes sense, and address the waste in mismanagement and allocate resources we see throughout government, evident in benghazi, they couldn't take a hundr
features the involvement of the professor from the university of california. working with local communities to rethink and refrain the perception and understanding of, you know, neighborhood security and human security so there are a lot of bottom-up approaches to changing the perception and changing the securities sector and you see some of these efforts happening in addition to the high level policies of that we have been discussing such as the police for egypt. >> thank you, hesham. i don't know if you have anything. okay let's take this final question and then i have one more very last question to pose to the panel before we close. >> good morning. my name is jason come independent researcher and consultant on issues mainly around policing conflict. so, my question is aimed primarily at bob and i will we get a little bit four tunisia. you know, he mentioned his paper and highlighted the problems and the challenges in libya and with a light footprint. not a kosovo or afghanistan or the iraq model where we have thousands of content and hundreds of thousands of people on the ground to be a
on the board of directors for sutter health, the largest not-for-profit health care organization in california. we've known for a long time that we have to have affordable, quality health care. when joseph asked about the responsibilities, it's all of our responsibilities. under the affordable care act, i think it was the first beginning of what we need to do in order to reform our health care system to make it affordable for all of us. i really like the ability to put my two boys back onto the health care system that we have today until they're 6. i also -- 26. i also like the ability to make sure no one's a slave to their job when it comes to pre-existing conditions. you know, health care is a big deal, but whether it's governor romney becomes president, we're going to have romneycare or we're going to have obamacare, because we need to solve this problem, and we need to solve it immediately. it's a collaborative effort between private, public, state can and local -- state and local government and the federal government. >> moderator: senator hatch? hatch: well, the so-called affordable care
stanford, california is. went to berkeley to get away from stanford. a state political theory. now was hired by a man i was working for as an assistant well was a student. the rest is history. >> of want to give him this comment. what influence to you think mr. hichens writing hand along with shaping women's history? >> i am not sure i know that he was the most egalitarian, seriously. he was absolutely -- he thought of women and men as complete equals. he wrote that piece for vanity fair. you know, it was one more assignment command eroded. if you actually read it does not -- the article does not say what the title might imply. yes. he was so nonsexist for a guy who was such a man's man in so loved by women. very charismatic. women adored him. he did not play the sexual cardinal. i don't know if he has a place in women's history perce, but just in the liberation of all groups. he would definitely have thought that the better law made sense. he would never think a woman should make less than a man. think maybe there is just -- that's it. i have nothing to say more. >> just a couple
him during the 2012 u.s. campaign. he was campaign manager for the landslide reelection of california governor in 2006. before that a top political advice sor in the white house of george w. bush. he attended the university of delaware from 1988 to 1993. david plouffe crossed paths in schmidt in the late 1980's. he completed his political seasons degree and finned two years ago. he has completed two presidential bids. he was appointed as a senior advice sor to the president in the white house in 2011. he attended is the marks high school before serving in a wide viret of state and national political campaigns. i'm going to ask the two speakers this evening to speak and i had to decide who is going to go first and i decided to use a standard that anyone this this audience could mean and that is whoever has won the most recent presidential election gets to speak first. i think that's the fair enough thing to do so please welcome david plouffe and steve schmidt to the university of delaware. [applause] >> thank you for joining thus evening. it's great to be back where steve and i had our
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